Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Matt Tully Is A Corrupt Pol's Dream Come True

If you want another example of why serious newspaper readers are turning away from the Gannett-owned Indianapolis Star, the newspaper's political columnist serves up another offering of the shallow and insulting fare this morning. Here's Matt Tully's spin on one of the mayor's largest campaign contributors being rewarded with a $6.35 million gift out of the money the City received from selling off the City's parking meter assets to another politically-connected campaign contributor to build a parking garage in which the taxpayers will have no ownership or receive any income:

Indianapolis is a city of engaged people -- politically and otherwise. This struck me most recently when a serious debate broke out over the announcement of a new parking garage in Broad Ripple. In how many cities of nearly 900,000 people would a simple parking garage turn into a lively political debate? Not many. But Indianapolis is the state's largest city and home to the Statehouse. So it is particularly politically charged and full of politically savvy people. Based on the emails and calls I've received for years now, I can assure you that people are passionate about both politics and policy around here . . .
Indy, of course, has all of the typical big-city problems: crime, failing schools, long-term fiscal uncertainty and more. But it seems that if those problems can be tackled effectively anywhere, it would be here. The problems are not as big in scope as in a metropolis such as Chicago. There's also a lot of talent here. So if the city's leaders and residents were willing to think bold, and that's a big if, it's easy to imagine a scenario in which Indianapolis could crack codes that have eluded cities from coast to coast . . .
The final thing I would say about the city is that there is ample room to succeed here. Indianapolis, in its modern and revamped version at least, is still young. There is the chance, as such, to get in almost on the ground floor. Those who have bright ideas, great work ethics or dynamic personalities quickly rise around here -- in politics, business, the arts and civic organizations.


A real political columnist would have discussed the raw greed and graft that went into cooking up a plan Tully describes as "bold." The only code-cracking of ideas that has taken place in Indianapolis is the erection of a two-party system of reward-sharing for those willing to stuff the politicians monies with as much money as their hearts desire without fear of criminal prosecution because the prosecutors are carefully chosen to ensure no corruption will be seriously investigated unless you get cross ways with one of the political bosses. In Chicago, The Tribune's John Kass describes the Faustian bargain struck between the leaders of the two political parties to provide "ample room to succeed" to those willing to Pay To Play as The Combine. The only difference between Indianapolis and Chicago is occasional existence of an independent federal prosecutor who's willing to rain on their Windy City parade a little when the "civic leaders" and their politician friends become a bit too greedy with the taxpayers' money. Too bad Tully doesn't share the passion for politics and policy that he says his readers share with him in their e-mails.

The Star's editors are determined not to be outdone by their political columnist when it comes to jounalistic malpractice. An editorial discusses our Secretary of State fighting for his livelihood over partisan-inspired complaints that he lived and voted in a precinct in which he didn't live for a period of a few months in between marriages and homes. Despite his vindication by a bipartisan vote of the Indiana  Recount Commission, the newspaper describes White's fight to prove his innocence as "stubborn, sometimes peculiar behavior." Huh? Apparently it's guilty until proven innocence beyond a reasonable doubt in the minds of the eggheads writing the editorials for the newspaper these days. While the newspaper's editors ruminate over Charlie's personal travails that have absolutely no impact on your lives, the looting of the public treasury continues unabated with the full blessing of these "high-thinking" people who know what's best for you.

Dick Cady weeps as Eugene Pulliam rolls over in his grave--again.

6 comments:

Paul K. Ogden said...

I would think the Star's editors might get the hint when the LA Times comes into Indy to write a story about Indiana pay to play politics, a story that was right in the Star's own backyard but the editors refused to cover it. It's what I've always said...the Star's coverage is too often driven by a political agenda of preservign the status quo pay to play political structure.

SW Lane said...

Gary, are any copies of Cady's book available around here?

Advance Indiana said...

I purchased my copy directly from Cady. Have you tried purchasing a copy online at amazon.com? It was available there earlier.

Downtown Indy said...

Tully needs his job so he's willing to do whatever whoring is required to keep it.

Rick Wilkerson said...

I got a copy of the Cady book at BookMama's in Irvington. Since they specialize in local books, I'd be surprised if they didn't still stock it.

Citizen Kane said...

Tully just wants to be part of the inner-circle, hoping that someday he will be able to get the big payday also. He has always been worthless. I don't expect anything more from him.