Tuesday, September 07, 2010

Victory Field Earns A Four-Star Rating

A website that reviews sports stadiums and arenas across the country has given a four-star rating (out of a possible 5) to Indianapolis' Victory Field. Paul Swaney's review at Stadiumjourney.com says the neighborhood in which the stadium is located is its greatest asset. Describing Victory Field as "an integral part of a great downtown area," Swaney notes "there are plenty of hotels within walking distance of the park." The nearby Loughmiller’s Pub & Eatery earns a favorable mention, as well as the Indiana Repertory Theater. Victory Field also earns high marks for its atmosphere, food and beverage accessibility and favorable ticket pricing. Swaney was not real impressed with the fans, most of whom were described as not talking about baseball or following the action of the game. Swaney also thought the stadium came up a little short on promoting the history of the Indianapolis Indians. He suggests a museum in the extra space in center field to highlight some of the baseball greats who have played for the Indians.

13 comments:

Cato said...

Because so many people rent a hotel room to see a minor league game.

Is Loughmiller's even open after the game, like bars and restaurants are in Chicago?

Victory Field is a nice park, but it was built with taxpayer dollars, and by being downtown, it limits downtown commercial growth. By putting a stadium downtown, a city forever limits the growth and character of the downtown.

People would think you off your rocker if you tried to put a stadium at State and Madison.

Advance Indiana said...

Soldier Field is in downtown Chicago. Cincinnati has football and baseball stadiums right downtown. St. Louis has Busch Stadium in the heart of its downtown. Victory Field has done much better at its current location than the old stadium out on 16th Street.

Cato said...

Soldier Field is absolutely NOT in downtown Chicago.

Soldier Field is 1500S and 400E. It's a two mile walk from Soldier Field to State and Madison. Just because there are big buildings in the background doesn't mean it's "downtown." By comparison, 400 W Division is 1200 N, the same distance to State and Madison. 400 W. Division is in the Near North Side, not downtown.

Check out the Gold Coast, Hyde Park and Schaumburg for examples of big buildings having nothing to do with downtown.

Advance Indiana said...

By that narrow definition of what constitutes Chicago's downtown, then Lucas Oil Stadium isn't downtown. It lays outside the mile square.

Cato said...

That isn't a "narrow definition of Chicago's downtown," Gary. Just how far South do you think downtown goes? Actually, I didn't "define" downtown, at all.

The only definition here is coming from you. Nowhere is it fixed that a downtown may only be one square mile, and nowhere is it fixed that Indy's downtown can never exceed the mile square. That's a goofy folksy idiosyncrasy these locals have.

As I mentioned, it's two miles from Soldier Field to State and Madison. Two miles South of Washington and Meridian is Meridian and Raymond. Nobody in Indy calls Meridian and Raymond "downtown."

In any event, while The Luke may be across the street from the mile square, the convention center isn't. Indy's downtown is hemmed in and burdened by three sports stadiums, hotels and a convention center. These non-commercial activities will forever limit the economic power of Indy's downtown.

indyernie said...

I like the idea of the museum. I little known tidbit of Indianapolis Indians history is...Roger Maris played right field for the Indians in 1956.

Advance Indiana said...

Technically, the Magnificent Mile isn't a part of Chicago's downtown but most people think of being downtown when they are shopping on Michigan Avenue. Some people think of downtown Chicago as encompassing the Loop, which covers a 1.6 square miles of the commercial district and takes in a lot of the parks and museums that are not technically a part of downtown. Technically, McCormick Place convention center isn't downtown, but people visiting there from out-of-town still consider it a part of Chicago's downtown attractions.

Cato said...

One more time, there are no technical definitions to downtown.

Chicagoans do not consider North Michigan "downtown." Neither do we ever consider McCormick Place downtown. It's on Cermak, for Pete's sake. Stay on it, and you hit Chinatown.

Suburbanites and people from smaller towns see all urban density as a blur, and since they come from lower-density cities, the only dense place is the downtown, so they use that crude vernacular in describing Chicago areas.

BTW, what park or museum is in the Loop? There is a technical definition to the Loop. Look up when you're on Wabash. It's the CTA elevated line that makes a loop.

Advance Indiana said...

The Art Institute is in the Loop. Grant Park and Millenium Park are in the Loop. The elevated line is no longer considered the demarcation points for the Loop. Most consider it to be bound by the Chicago River on the north and west sides and Roosevelt Road on the south side. Most people think of Navy Pier as being part of downtown Chicago, but strictly speaking, it is just north of the Chicago River.

Cato said...

Sorry, Gary, but the Loop is and always will be, the Loop. What "loop" do we have if we're using streets and geographic features? There's no "loop" with such boundaries. What's "looping?"

People from Naperville may get sloppy with their definitions, but they can use "downtown." "Downtown" and "the Loop" are not synonyms.

The Art Institute and Grant Park are near the Loop, but not in it.

Advance Indiana said...

Take it up with Wiki then, Cato, if you don't agree with what the Loop is today.

Cato said...

Wiki, Gary? Really?

Advance Indiana said...

Yes, Michael Scott says it's a great reference source. LOL